Succulent ART | Tutorials - Projects

Projects


Project Tips

colours

Colours

Consider different colour combinations that work with the colour of your container - Contrasting colours offer a vibrant look, where analogous colours are more natural and harmonious.

heights

Heights

Combining different heights will give you a fantastic dynamic look. Place tall succulents in the centre of your design as a focal point, then small trailing succulents around the edges. Fill in the gaps with medium sized succulents. The effect will be a balanced look that is pleasing to the eye.

balance

Balance

Use an odd number of multiples for particular species - It will balance out your design. Place multiples in a triangular pattern so that they are equally spaced apart.

quantities

Quantities

Don't be afraid to pack many succulents into a small space. Succulents are more than happy to coexist with each other in tight places. Plus it will help to make your arrangement look more compact and lush.

Be creative!

Be Creative!

Your imagination is your only limit! Scrounge around your home, back shed, local op-shop or salvage yard - You would be amazed at what spectacular artworks you can make out of the most unlikely of objects!


Succulent Wreath

Succulent Wreath
How to make a Succulent Wreath
Succulents We used: Crassula perforata, Aeonium haworthii, Crassula anomala, Sedum clavatum, Sedum rubrotinctum, Sedum nussbaumerianum and Aeonium arboreum var atropurpureum.
Materials Wire wreath frame, sphagnum moss, thin wire and a cacti and succulent potting mix.
Uses Hang your succulent wreath up on a wall or door or lay down flat to use as a clever table centre piece.
How to Assemble Hydrate the sphagnum moss as directed on the packaging. Wire the moss thickly onto the succulent frame and place succulent cuttings into the moss. Position cuttings of the same species equally opposite each other to form a triangular pattern. Water in well and lay flat until all the plants have established roots (this may take up to several weeks). More succulent cuttings may be added at any time to make the wreath look full and lush.
Maintenance Water daily and don't allow to dry out. A part shade position is preferred. Prune regularly to encourage dense, new growth. Fertilise with both a seaweed and a blood and bone solution as directed.
How long will it last? Succulent wreaths can last for years with regular watering, fertilising and pruning.

Succulent Under the Sea Chest

Succulent Under the Sea Chest
How to make a Succulent Under the Sea Chest
Succulents Use succulents that resemble coral for that 'under the sea' look. We used: Cotyledon papillaris, Senecio serpens (Dwarf Chalk Sticks), Crassula ovata 'Gollum', Senecio mandraliscae, Cotyledon obiculata 'Silver Waves', Rhipsalis salicornioides, Orbea variegata, Kalanchoe thyrsiflora and Crassula ovata 'Undulata'.
Materials A chest, small sea shells (mulch), 1 or 2 large sea shells, cacti and succulent potting mix, controlled release fertiliser.
Uses Smaller chests are great to place onto shelves or as a centre piece on a table. Bigger chests are a fantastic feature for a courtyard or garden.
How to Assemble Drill holes in the bottom of your treasure chest so that it has adequate drainage. Plant the succulents into the chest using a cacti and succulent potting mix. Place the large sea shells as focal points in the arrangement. Cover the exposed soil area with the small shell mulch. Fertilise with a controlled release fertiliser. Water in well.
Maintenance Can be placed either indoors or outdoors. If indoors, place next to a window and water twice a week in summer, once a fortnight in winter. If outdoors in the sun, water daily in summer, once a fortnight in winter. Watering can be reduced if under cover. Prune regularly to promote new, dense growth. Apply a controlled release fertiliser every six months as directed.
How long will it last? Succulents planted into a container with drainage holes can last for years with regular watering, pruning and fertilising. Consider the durability of the chest you are going to plant in if you wish for your succulent project to last.

Succulent Book

Succulent Book
How to make a Succulent Book
Succulents We used: Cerepegia woodii, Crassula perforata, Sedum nussbaumerianum, Graptopetalum paraguayense, Crassula cv. 'david', Portulacaria afra variegata, Crassula anomala, Sempervivum sp., Senecio serpens (Dwarf Chalk Sticks) and Crassula pruinosa.
Materials An old, hard covered book (cloth bound books look amazing for this project), a knife, sphagnum moss.
Uses A decorative piece that can be placed on a coffee table, side table or shelf.
How to Assemble Using the knife, cut out a square in several pages of the book. Be sure to leave a wide margin and to cut enough pages so the hole is 4cm - 5cm deep. Place succulent plants or cuttings into the hole, using damp sphagnum moss to fill any gaps. Do not water the plants as this will damage the pages - the succulents can last a couple of weeks without water. When you have finished with your project, take out the succulents and reuse them as you wish. Brush your book clean and store for your next Succulent ART project!
Maintenance Place the book indoors only. No watering or maintenance required. When you have finished with your project, take out the succulents and reuse them as you wish. Brush your book clean and store for your next Succulent ART project!
How long will it last? Succulent Books are a temporary decorative piece, and will last a couple of weeks without water.

Succulent Pot Spill

Succulent Pot Spill
How to make a Succulent Pot Spill
Succulents We used: Sedum nussbaumerianum, Sempervivum tectorum 'Greenii', Crassula anomala and Sedum rubrotinctum.
Materials Gravel or pebbles, a decorative pot (this is a great project for a semi-broken pot).
Uses An unusual, temporary art piece that can go on a side table, shelf or dining table. Great table centre piece for an event or wedding. Can also be a fantastic permanent display for a focal point in the garden.
How to Assemble Position your pot sideways as if it has fallen over. If you're creating this project in the garden, you can slightly bury the pot to give it stability. Place some of the gravel or pebbles in the pot and place the rest spilling outwards from the pot. Arrange succulent cuttings in the gravel randomly to give a 'spilled' appearance. If you're creating this project in the garden, you can use established plants instead of cuttings and plant them into the ground under the gravel.
Maintenance For a temporary table display, no maintenance is required as cuttings can last a couple of weeks without water. If you wish to extend the life of the display, you can sprits with a little water daily. When you have finished with your project, take out the succulents and reuse them as you wish. For a permanent garden display, water daily until established, then once or twice a week. No need to water during winter unless under cover. Prune regularly to keep the display dense and tidy and use a controlled release fertiliser as directed.
How long will it last? A permanent garden display will last for many years with a little maintenance. A temporary table display can last a couple of weeks without water.

Succulent Box

Succulent Box
How to make a Succulent Box
Succulents We used: Sempervivum tectorum, Sedum nussbaumerianum, Gasteraloe sp. and Crassula sp.
Materials Cacti and succulent potting mix, topping (we used sphagnum moss but you can use gravel or pebbles) and your favorite pot, box or container with a drainage hole.
Uses Large containers are great for patios, verandahs, front entrances and focal points in your garden. They can be positioned indoors provided they are near a window. Smaller containers are perfect for table tops, shelves and window sills.
How to Assemble Drill a hole in the bottom of your container if it does not have a drainage hole. Fill your container one third high with the cacti and succulent mix. Arrange your succulents in the container. Work in odd numbers per species as this has more impact. Choose a grand succulent to place as a focal point in the centre of your design. Then place low, spilling plants around the edge of the container. Place in the gaps medium height succulents. Fill with the remaining cacti and succulent mix and cover with your topping or mulch. Water in well and allow to drain.
Maintenance Prune regularly to keep foliage dense and compact. Fertilise with a controlled release fertiliser as directed. Watering will depend on where the container is placed, see care information - containers for more information.
How long will it last? Succulent containers can last for many years with regular maintenance.

Succulent Jug

Succulent Jug
How to make a Succulent Jug - The Charcoal Method
Succulents We used: Senecio rowleyanus (String of Pearls), Sempervivum tectorum 'Greenii', Sedum nussbaumerianum and Crassula anomala.
Materials Ceramic or china jug (does not require a drainage hole, as we will be using The Charcoal Method), charcoal, sphagnum moss, cacti and succulent potting mix, topping ( such as gravel, pebbles or more sphagnum moss).
Uses A beautiful window sill ornament, or hang it up under cover as an interesting talking piece.
How to Assemble As the jug we are using does not have drainage holes, we are going to use The Charcoal Method to create this Succulent ART project. Place a layer of charcoal at the bottom of the jug. Then place a layer of hydrated sphagnum moss over the charcoal (this prevents the cacti and succulent potting mix from falling in and around the charcoal pieces). Plant your succulents into the jug on top of the sphagnum moss using the cacti and succulent mix. Plant a trailing succulent at the spout of the jug for an appealing 'pouring' effect. Fill any gaps with your topping. Water in, but be careful to not over water as the container has no drainage.
Maintenance Avoid over watering as this container has no drainage. Keep the water level to no higher than the level of the charcoal. Prune occasionally to encourage new growth. Fertilise with a controlled release fertiliser as directed.
How long will it last? Succulents planted into containers with no drainage can last for years, provided you take care to not over water them.

Sansevieria Vase

Sansevieria Vase
How to make a Sansevieria Vase - The Expanded Clay Method
Succulents We used: Sansevieria sp. for this project, but you could choose a succulent from a wide array of species, including most Gasterias, Aloes, Euphorbias and Haworthias. Ensure that your succulents are well established and have an ample root system.
Materials Glass vase or container (does not require a drainage hole, as we will be using The Expanded Clay Method) expanded clay (available from selected Succulent ART retailers) and a small piece of charcoal.
Uses A spectacular indoor glass display that works great on a side table, dining room table or window sill.
How to Assemble As the vase we are using does not have drainage holes, we are going to use The Expanded Clay Method to create this Succulent ART project. Place a small piece of charcoal at the bottom of the vase - this helps keep the water clean and clear. Rinse the expanded clay balls to get rid of any dirt or dust. Fill your container with the expanded clay. Prepare your succulents by rinsing any soil off of the roots and plant into the expanded clay. Fill the vase with water to one third the height of the container.
Maintenance Place indoors where it can receive adequate light. Avoid over watering as this container has no drainage. Keep the water level to no higher than a third of the height of the vase. Prune occasionally to encourage new growth. Fertilise with a controlled release fertiliser as directed.
How long will it last? Succulents planted into containers with no drainage can last for years, provided you take care to not over water them.